Space Art Monday: Titan’s Gigantic Ice Cloud

Titan's Gigantic Ice Cloud
Titan’s Gigantic Ice Cloud

Saturn’s Moon, Titan has a gigantic ice cloud at its southern pole! This was spotted by the spacecraft Cassini operated by NASA earlier this month.

Titan has a thick, nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and is the only world in the solar system other than Earth known to possess stable liquid on its surface.

But Titan’s seas are composed of ethane and methane rather than water. Many scientists regard Titan as one of the solar system’s best bets to host alien life.

What types of saurian species might live on Titan?

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Space Art Monday: Great Dark Lane

Great Dark Lane
Great Dark Lane toll keeper

Guess what?

Scientists have found a previously unidentified highway of star dust that extends across the Milky Way, between the sun and the central bulge of the galaxy.

They are calling this The Great Dark Lane. The Great Dark Lane extends approximately 20 degrees across the sky, reaching both above and below the plane of the galaxy. It sits roughly 15,000 light-years from the solar system.

So who travels along this Great Dark Lane? The Great Dark Lane toll keeper.

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Space Art Monday: Taurid meteors

Taurid meteors
Taurid meteors

Taurid meteors are sometimes called “Halloween fireballs”. Fireballs are extremely bright meteors!

Taurid meteors will create one of this year’s longest meteor showers, with at least a couple of shooting stars per hour. Be on the look out from November 5th through November 12th when the Taurids are most active. These meteors are often yellowish-orange.

During peak times, about a dozen or so meteors may be seen per hour with clear, dark skies.

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Space Art Monday: Water on Mars

Water on Mars
Water on Mars

What does water on Mars look like? They haven’t seen flowing water on the surface. But they have seen something that darkens the soil! Which may be just liquid.

Mars had liquid water on its surface billions of years ago when they had ice ages and water was distributed through polar ice caps.

Where did the water go? Was it lost into space? Or is still frozen in its crust today?

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Space Art Monday: Super Blood Moon

Blood Moon
Blood Moon

Did you have a chance to see the Super Blood Moon last night or today depending on where you live?

It is a lunar eclipse with the moon at its closest point to Earth.

This is a spectacular celestial event that has not occurred for 30 years and the next one will be in 2033.

There are many folklore and myths about the Super Blood Moon!

Here is my space art of the week.

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Space Art Wednesday: star patterns of sea creatures

star patterns and sea creatures
star patterns of sea creatures

Autumn skies are here with star patterns of many sea creatures. Step outside this week between 9 and 11 pm and look toward the south.

You will see the constellation of Capricornus. A Sea Goat, which has the head of a goat and the tail of a fish. The stars of the Sea Goat form a triangular figure that looks like a sail on a ship, or a slice of watermelon.

According to ancient mythology, the story of the sea goat went like this; some sea nymphs and goddesses were playing in a field one day when the mischievous Pan, the god of shepherds and of woods and pastures, saw them and joined in the fun. Everything was going great until a huge, ferocious monster called Typhon suddenly appeared. To escape him, each god changed into an animal and fled. However, in Pan’s alarm he jumped into a nearby river before completing his transformation into a goat. As a result, his lower body assumed the form of a fish.

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Space Art Monday: Pareidolia on Mars

Pareidolia on Mars
Pareidolia on Mars

Pareidolia on Mars!

Pareidolia is a psychological phenomenon that makes our brains interpret some kind of random visual stimulus as a familiar pattern or object.

Some famous examples of space pareidolia on Mars are “Face of Mars”, where a hill in the Cydonia region of Mars created a pattern of a human face. The “Floating Spoon” where a rock formation juts way out making it look like a floating spoon. The “Iguana” which is a unique sitting rock on Mars.

So far no one has used their imagination to name this formation on Mars. Could it be an alien space ship?

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